Monthly Archives: August 2017

Illegals as Cuckoos

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Who Needs A Functional Refugee Policy In A Borderless World?

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Who Needs A Functional Refugee Policy In A Borderless World?

by Tim Murray

No doubt you have seen images of some of the more than 10,000 migrants who have streamed illegally into Canada from the United States at unofficial border crossings — for the most part in Manitoba and Quebec. What began as a trickle eight months ago has become a flood in August. The City of Montreal reported that while there were 50 per day in the first half of July, there are between 250 and 300 crossing illegally now.

The sheer logistics of processing, transporting, sheltering and feeding this latest surge of border-jumpers has overwhelmed the limited resources of the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). And the RCMP is pitching in too, smiling at migrants as they help them with their luggage. It seems that this fabled law enforcement agency has become an extension of the hospitality industry, a collection of bell hops and Walmart greeters. Or are they the public relations arm of the globalist government in Ottawa? Perhaps they should be wearing their ceremonial red serge uniforms as they chaperone illegals.

Amidst the chaos, make-shift shelters have been constructed and initial screening and vetting checks postponed. Because of the swell of refugee claims, the basic background check that would normally take 72 hours to complete will now take two months. Will Canada mimic Europe, overwhelmed by mass migration and the problems that ensue from it? The signs are ominous. The ship of state is drifting, and there is a flake at the helm.

This crisis caught authorities by surprise. But it shouldn’t have. When President Trump mused about suspending the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for 60,000 Haitians, one could have expected that they would make a mad dash to the candy store up north. Especially when they got a personal invitation from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, always anxious to play the role of the white knight of generosity and compassion. His twitter message was, “Regardless of who you are or where you came from, there’s always a place for you in Canada.” Come on in!

Trudeau’s hypocrisy was breathtaking. What the media failed to notice that Canada had a temporary program for displaced Haitian “quake-fugees” of its own, but it was wound down in August of 2016— under Justin Trudeau’s watch! So instead of telling Haitian asylum-seekers the truth, that the government was unprepared to receive them, the Prime Minister chose to grandstand, to contrast himself to the evil Trump. He was going to drive the Welcome Wagon and set up impromptu welcome stations along the border. The claimants would be bussed to Montreal, one of Canada’s ten self-styled “sanctuary cities”. Yes, Canada has them too. What columnist Daniel Greenfield called “the coalition of the self-righteous”.

Renegade city councils voted to permit illegal migrants to receive housing, avail themselves of food banks, libraries and other services with no questions asked about their immigration status. In sane times it would be unthinkable for the most junior level of government to refuse to cooperate with federal law enforcement officers. But these are not sane times. Instead, city law enforcement agencies have been ordered not to apprehend “undocumented” immigrants or indeed inquire into their immigration status. One gains the impression that the Trudeau administration is not terribly upset with this arrangement.

Taxpayers, however, have a different view. It should not come as a shock that 41% of Canadians polled by the Angus Reid Institute supported the statement that Canada was taking in too many refugees. And a Reuters poll conducted on March 8-9 found that all but 36% of respondents believed that those illegally crossing the border should not be allowed to remain in the country. They are not in love with the idea that queue jumpers who bypassed official border crossings to do an end run around the Canada-U.S. Safe Third Country agreement, can just walk into the country, declare that they are seeking refugee status, and while in limbo apply for work permits and receive social assistance. Simply put, the ongoing invasion is trying their patience.

No wonder. Former Deputy Immigration Minister John Manion once estimated that refugee claimant expenditures alone cost Canadian taxpayers around $2 billion/year. The cumulative cost in the fifteen years following 1985 would put it in the $30 billion range. And it doesn’t help when many deportation cases become mired in extended legal battles in the courts. But as costly as this proves to be, deportation is a bargain compared to the annual $30-35 billion net fiscal burden that largely unskilled migrant citizens impose on other Canadians. The fact is that these migrants do not earn enough income to pay the taxes necessary to defray the costs of the social services provided to them. In the case of Syrian migrants, it was found that after one year of residency, only one in ten (12%) had found employment.

This is not a recipe for smooth integration, and it bodes ill for their Canadian-born children. Already, some 43% of second generation visible minority youth in Canada feel themselves to be alienated victims. The myth of Canadian ‘Exceptionalism’, of our having found the secret formula for ethnic and racial harmony, is wearing thin on the ground. The jury is in. Canada has a limited absorptive capacity. Cities like Vancouver are suffering from ethnic indigestion. Too many too fast and without the necessary resources to help them. Rather than fit into the nation, many newcomers are fitting into ethnic enclaves that have grown exponentially . Liberal commentators call this diversity, but others call it cultural fragmentation and emergent tribalism. The downstream costs are incalculable. Public safety and security may exact the greatest toll.

All of this is the bitter harvest of the infamous “Singh decision” handed down by the Supreme Court of Canada in 1985, when our learned judges determined that Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms meant that all “persons,” not just citizens, were entitled to full Charter protection simply by having their feet planted on Canadian soil. Since then illegal migrants are like the guests on Groucho Marx’s “You Bet Your Life”. Say the magic words, “I am a refugee” and you win the prize. All they need to do is get here. That’s it. And the easiest way to do that is to walk through an unguarded border crossing. Presto, you’re in. Getting you out, on the other hand, can take 3-5 years, assuming that you don’t play hide and seek.

The trouble with Canada’s refugee system is that, as Margaret Thatcher would have said, “Eventually you run out of other people’s money.” The Canadian Welfare State, or any welfare state, cannot survive the crushing burden that untold numbers of failed state migrants will place upon it. The late Nobel Peace Prize winning economist Milton Friedman was right. You can have the welfare state or you can have open borders, but you can’t have both. Unlimited generosity is not sustainable.

In order to pre-empt a nativist backlash, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale assured Canadians that crossing the border illegally was not an automatic free ticket to citizenship. But Goodale was disingenuous. He neglected to mention that Canada will not deport people to 12 designated countries and locations, mainly in Africa and the Middle East — unless they stand convicted of a crime or a human rights infraction or are deemed to be a security risk. According to the latest available data supplied by the Immigration and Refugee Board, almost one in four people who were allowed to make a claim in the first nine months of 2016 were from one of these areas.

Many of them are Somali claimants who made up the bulk of illegal border crossers in Emerson, Manitoba. They are the beneficiaries of what is known as an “administrative deferral of removal.” Temporary bans can be removed at any time of course, but if recent history is any guide, these claimants will be allowed time to apply for permanent residency. All of this proves asylum-shopping works. Shop around and you’ll soon find out that Canada is a soft touch.

Now for the dirty little secret of Canada’s refugee system. Roughly half of refugee claimants who are deported are not “removed”. They don’t show up at the appointed place at the appointed time.

To illustrate the point, it might be helpful to consider the testimony of former senior immigration enforcement officer David Richardson. While Richardson was careful to point out that he left the department in 2003, an officer he spoke with at Pearson International airport confirmed that, in his words, “Not much has changed on the refugee front, at least in Toronto.”

Richardson continued:

When I worked in Removals, sending failed claimants back to the U.S. at Buffalo N.Y., less than 50% of failed claimants showed up for removal. At that time the Fort Erie Point of Entry (POE) alone was taking in over 5,000 claims a year. Multiply that by the numbers taken in at the major airports and POEs across the country and it could be conservatively estimated that approximately 65 to 70 thousand claims are received a yea r, easily. Now (since) these other POEs were getting the same removal numbers as Fort Erie as I am sure they were — based on my conversations with fellow officers in my position as Union Rep for Southern Ontario — then you can safely estimate that 20-30 thousand claimants were no-shows for removals. Incredibly, the department’s response to these numbers was that the no-shows left on their own! Yeah, I know, I was dumbfounded too.

Richardson added that since departments only keep stats for the most recent five years, the total number of no-shows is unknown. There is no running total. And to this day no one knows how many deportees or illegals still reside in the country as no solid exit data exists as no exit controls are in place.

One-time Immigration Minister Joe Volpe once estimated that there were 120,000 illegals in Canada. Some are visa overstays — temporary foreigner workers and students — but many are rejected refugee claimants who have disappeared into the warm welcoming bosom of our growing list of sanctuary cities. It is not hard to disappear in Toronto, or any other ‘progressive’ jurisdiction where an illegal migrant on the lam can find a safe harbour and a cheap labour employer that stands ready to hire them.

Meanwhile, in the wake of 9/11 federal governments have sought to assuage public anxiety by promising more resources for border security while they quietly lay off staff. This is what David Richardson calls “The Big Lie”. Veterans of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) would say the same thing. They don’t need changes in the law to do their job. They just need more people. If there was a will, there would be a way. But there isn’t.

In surveying recent decades of immigration and refugee policy and performance, one can conclude two things. The system is broken. And no government has had a sincere wish to fix it. Certainly not the reigning Trudeau Liberals. Instead of developing a plan of action to stem the surge of illegal immigration, the government is responding with reactionary band-aid solutions driven largely by political posturing with little understanding of what constitutes sound asylum policy. Rather than composing a coherent strategy, they are haphazardly importing America’s problems.

So why then did we vote for them? Why do politicians with no interest in controlling migrant flows or maintaining the integrity of the system continue to be elected? The awful truth is that fifty years of social engineering and open borders propaganda have left their mark. Belief in national sovereignty has been going out of fashion, nowhere more so than in Canada. To the point that a Canadian Prime Minister can now proudly boast that ours is the world’s first “post-national” state, a microcosm of the dis-United Nations. When Barack Obama told a Montreal audience last spring that he was a “citizen of the world” , they clapped loudly. They found another brother-in-arms, as if the preening charlatan in the Prime Minister’s Office was not enough. I mean, how many Quislings do Canadians need?

If you want to know how Justin Trudeau views the nation, then read the words spoken by Serge Bouchereau, the organizer of an event outside Montreal’s Olympic Stadium to welcome Haitian asylum-seekers. “This is a vast, rich country that can welcome many, many more people who are in bad situations and can’t stay in their countries.”

How many more you ask? The sky is the limit and the queue is endless.

No problem. After all, who needs a functional refugee and immigration policy in a borderless world?

Eyewitness Account of Today’s Anti-immigration Rally in Quebec City

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Eyewitness Account of Today’s Anti-immigration Rally in Quebec City
Violent Antifa street thugs attacked immigration protesters today in Quebec City, but, in the end, the march organized by a group call La Meute proceeded.
CTV (August 18, 2017) reported: “Hundreds of members of a far-right group marched to protest illegal immigration in Quebec City on Sunday, but were delayed by several hours by far-left protesters who tried to shut them down by force.

The far-right demonstration was organized by La Meute, which translates from French to “the pack.” The group is opposed to Islam and many view it as racist.

La Meute had a permit to protest and planned to march at 2 p.m., but was confronted by hundreds of left-wing protesters, some calling themselves “anti-fascists.”

After police attempted to allow the far-right march to go ahead, left-wing protesters – some wearing face-coverings — launched fireworks, lit fires and lobbed bottles and chairs. They also attacked members of the media.

Police quickly declared the left-wing counter-protest illegal, citing “violence and vandalism,” but many protesters remained. The far-right group waited inside a government building until the standoff ended. At least one person was arrested.

La Meute proceeded to march around 6 p.m., carrying signs that said things like: “It’s not racist or xenophobic to want to preserve quality of life and the safety of the country.” Others held signs that referenced “free speech.”

La Meute claims that it does not discriminate based on race but is opposed to illegal border crossings. The RCMP intercepted 3,800 asylum seekers crossing the border between the U.S. and Quebec between Aug. 1 and 15, after intercepting nearly 3,000 in July.”

Quebec protest

A medic tends to a man injured during clashes between Quebec’s far-right and counter-protesters. The man had been carrying a Patriote flag, a symbol of Quebec nationalism. (Maxime Corneau/Radio-Canada)

A good supporter sent us this report.

“There was a political demonstration today in Quebec City by a group called “La Meute” (“Meute” is French for “pack” or “wolfpack”).  I live in the region, so I decided to try to join their anti-immigration march near the provincial legislature building despite my not being an official member or Facebook friend of La Meute.  I tried, but I couldn’t get in since the place was blocked by left-wing protesters who knew of the location of La Meute’s rally point in the basement of a parkade.
La Meute’s facebook publicly said they would meet in the basement at 2:00 pm.  I looked at the anti-fa’s facebook, and they were having a simultaneous rally at 2:00 pm around 500 meters away.  I waited outside the parkade for a good time to enter the basement to meet with La Meute, and saw about 5 La Meute members entering with their flags and paw print t-shirts.  However, my waiting for a good time was a bad idea, as a whole bunch of the impatient anti-fa protesters arrived there at around 1:50 pm.  There were so many, that the Quebec City police could not hold them back, it appears.  It looked like there were about 3 types of antifa:  1) people who weren’t afraid to show their face, 2) young anarchists whose faces were covered with bandanas (henceforth “bandanas”) and 3) communists with their red flags.  The various groups did not seem to have a central leader, but were obviously united in their ideology.  I saw banners for open immigration, and anti-capitalism.  The usual unholy alliance and sympathisers tagged along.
Faced with the likelihood of not being able to join the La Meute protest, I just sat and mingled with the anti-fa counterprotesters and watched, trying not to gather too much attention to myself, hoping for a later opportunity to join with the La Meute people, but in vain.  At one point, I asked (in French) some passing La Meute members if I could march with them, but they didn’t respond, understandably a little concerned about getting attacked by the bandana wearers who were shouting at them, just meters from me.  At that point onward, I was definitely targeted by the bandanas as a possible right-winger, although in the confusion, some of the distant anti-fa may have thought I was just a blogger, wannabe journalist, or just stupidly curious.  At one point the bandanas were ripe for violence against me and started yelling “fuck off”, but a hefty policeman with a holstered handgun protected me.  If not, I might have been in a fistfight with the antifa or worse (being far outnumbered).  Being around 50 years old, the youngsters were maybe a little hesitant to attack an old man anyway.  But it was close.  I didn’t leave though, since I had spent 2 hours getting to the location, and I wanted to see what happened when the protesters would meet the counter-protesters.  I didn’t travel all that way for nothing.  I was mostly looking at my cell-phone on a set of cement steps, almost like a middle-aged man minding his own business on a summer day, looking at the news.
I did not have a bird’s eye view of everything that went on, viewed from every street, but I gather that the La Meute gathering was very very small.  I estimate that they were around 10 people, and they were far far outnumbered by the various antifa protesters outside (I guess around 600 people).  In the media, La Meute claimed around 600 followers in the basement of the parkade, but I can not confirm that.  La Meute members never did hold their public protest outside while I was there, so I left at 3:00 pm (being bored, having waited 1 hour for their march to start).
While I was there, I saw a few events that were not reported in the media.
1) Some La Meute members were leaving the basement of the parkade, and were heckled by bandanas from a hillock above the street.  The La Meute people, 2 men, and 1 young woman, were departing from the march rally point, it seems, they had some signs for the planned La Meute march, but the signs were blank, and had no writing on them at all.  One bandana threw a wooden stake downward toward the three La Meute members.  The stake was hefty enough, around 2 inches by 2 inches, and around 4 feet long with an angled tip.  If the stake had been thrown with any more force or accuracy it could have seriously injured someone or have taken out an eye.  Fortunately the stake hit the pavement, and only skidded toward the three La Meute people.  The bandanas were yelling “fuck off” at them.  The La Meute woman shouted back at them in french that she would get her revenge someday.  Many of the bandanas had English accents, and were either from anglophone communities in Montreal, or were from outside the province or country.
2) One short bandana was a college-age woman.  She had a black satchel filled with what sounded like empty beer bottles rattling around, ready to pitch at police or La Meute members, if needed.  I didn’t ever see her throw any of the bottles, but she was there with her satchel, and nervous, with uncertain flight-or-fight eyes.  The bandana types were dressed mostly in black pants, black t-shirts and black bandanas incidentally.  The bandanas were hopping around and chanting, and very restless, almost like a troop of hooting chimpanzees spoiling for battle.  They constantly went from location to location, and hopped from guardrails down to the sidewalk that I was on.  At one point, they went around the parkade building and disappeared from my view for around 30 minutes.  I find it curious that despite the fact that the antifa vastly outnumbered La Meute, I saw fear in her eyes, perhaps a little from fear of the police, but just a little fear maybe from the fact that there could be a confrontation with La Meute?  I speculate.
3) Perhaps the most interesting event to me was a passerby by who went by the antifa at the wrong time.  I did not see them doing the act, but when the man passed by me, his face was covered with black ink.  It looked like the kind of ink that one can wash off (water soluble).  So at least they did not throw permanent dye on the man’s face.  A bunch of reporters descended on him, and asked him questions.  He was in his late forties, well groomed, white, and had a salt and pepper beard.  He had black trousers and a purple dress shirt.  He told the reporters that he was not a member of La Meute, and that he was just visiting the Quebec area.  It seems the anti-fa threw some of the ink on him from above as he passed by on the street below.  Perhaps they mistook him for a wealthy man, which is almost as bad as a racist in the communist’s eyes.  One of the anti-fa medical types (see below) gave him some kleenex or wipes so that he could start to wipe off the paint/ink from his face.  I am not sure if he was from La Meute or not, but if he wasn’t, then the anti-fa got a little carried away on that innocent guy.
4) At around 2:30pm a male sympathiser with La Meute tried to get inside of the police blockade (remember, I was viewing him from inside “enemy lines” so-to-speak), but the police pushed him back with much male force, seemingly concerned for his safety, or because he was a late arrival
5) The bandanas seem to have a designated medical staff with red tape in the form of a cross on their shoulders, a designated quasi-medical corps among the anti-fa (not a bad idea!).  One of the women had some antiseptic napkins in a fanny pack, and probably some bandages, if necessary. In the news, I saw a picture of a different woman with a similar “Red Cross” type of colored tape on her shoulders.  So there was more than one of these medical helpers.  The quasi-medical staff lends an air of legitimacy and organization to the antifa, despite their violent bent.
6) The protesters were overwhelmingly young and white (I guess around 97% white).  
7) One bandana leader was a young college-aged man with piercing blue eyes (almost like an actor’s eyes).  When he spoke  French, it was with a North American English accent.
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Canada Day on Roxham Road: protesters, supporters clash over asylum seekers at border

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Canada Day on Roxham Road: protesters, supporters clash over asylum seekers at border

Far-right, migrant advocacy groups gather at popular Quebec border crossing

Roxham Road asylum

The two groups confronted each other from across a divide created by Sûreté du Québec and RCMP officers. (CBC)


As a small group of asylum seekers headed through a wooded area at the Canada-U.S. border crossing in Hemmingford, Que. on Canada Day, two clashing groups of protesters and supporters waited nearby.

Storm Alliance and La Meute, self-described “ultranationalist” groups, organized a demonstration in time for the nation’s 150th anniversary at Roxham Road to protest would-be refugee claimants crossing the border on foot.

“We want to send a message, we want the government to send a message to anybody that wants to cross over illegally, unlawfully that there’s going to be people looking out for you,” said Dave Tregget, the national president of Storm Alliance.

As dozens donned black T-shirts and patrolled the crossing Saturday morning, they were met by a counter protest organized by a migrant advocacy group.

Holding up colourful posters welcoming refugees, Solidarity Across Borders members also gathered at the popular spot for asylum seekers.

“They are a group that’s enabling racism and hiding behind other issues,” said Montreal-based activist Jaggi Singh.

“They say they’re defending the charter of rights — well if you’re really defending the charter of rights defend the rights of refugees to cross and make their claims.”

Roxham Road Canada Day

Solidarity Across Borders members also gathered at the popular spot for asylum seekers. (CBC)

The busload of supporters clapped as a Nigerian family made their way through the ditch and into Canada, while others raised questions about asylum seekers and lax border laws.

“They’re criminals,” said Pearl Roy. “They’re coming into our country illegally and we’re welcoming this?”

The family was then taken into custody by RCMP officers and brought to their offices, said Staff Sergeant Brian Byrne.

Byrne said asylum seekers are taken into custody so officers run background checks. They then can start the process of making a refugee claim.

War of words

The two groups confronted each other from across a divide created by Sûreté du Québec and RCMP officers, who wouldn’t let protesters from either side make their way through.

It isn’t the first time far-right and migrant advocacy groups from Quebec have made their way to at the popular crossing spot in the Montérégie region.

While members of the Storm Alliance and La Meute have been routinely gathering in clusters to quietly observe asylum seekers for a few months, the situation on Canada Day quickly grew tense.

Singh turned to a woman on the other side, wearing a white-and-red shirt with a maple leaf on and with the words “old stock and proud.”

“​What do you mean old stock? Where are you from?” he said.

Roxham Road protest

Police were present at the duelling protests at Roxham Road on Canada Day. (CBC)

She took a sip from her water bottle and spit it out in his direction, smiling briefly, before giving Singh the middle finger.

“I’m not any less Canadian or Québécois than you,” Singh said.