Tag Archives: CSIS

Would You Invite a Rattlesnake Into Your Home? Canada Did!

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Would You Invite a Rattlesnake Into Your Home? Canada Did!
May 29, 2018
PART 1

If Trudeau and his government need more evidence of China’s sinister intentions in Canada, here is a summary of the evidence that a joint RCMP-CSIS report gave Ottawa about 20 years ago. This report is even more relevant today.

(1) The report was sub-titled “SIDEWINDER”. That is a comparison of Mainland China to a rattlesnake. It is another way of saying that it was foolish to have allowed a rattlesnake into Canada. The purpose of the joint RCMP-CSIS project was “to assess the extent of the threat posed by the acquisition and control of Canadian companies by members or associates of Chinese triads (organized crime) and those with affiliations to Chinese Intelligence (Spy) Services”. (P.3)

(2) When Deng Xiaoping took over China in the late 1970’s, he introduced his economic reforms with the slogan “To get rich is glorious”. However, he and his regime knew nothing about how the West and capitalism operated, so they went to the richest Chinese in Hong Kong and to Chinese organized crime (triads) for advice. In return, Deng gave these groups privileged access to China’s economy. Triads were involved in illegality: gambling, extortion, prostitution, human trafficking and even political assassinations. Deng referred to the triads as “patriotic groups”.

(3) A significant presence of organized crime was detected in “investor” immigrants from Hong Kong to Canada from the mid-1980’s on. This presence consisted of two groups (A) Very rich Chinese business people who had been known to be co-operating with the Mainland Chinese government for years and (B) Associates and relatives of China’s leadership and the Chinese Intelligence (Spy) Service (ChIS). Co-operation between Hong Kong tycoons, triads and the Beijing leadership raised the level of the threat. Mainland China was looking for Canadian technology and for ways to interfere in Canada. In order to understand what Mainland China intended, Canadians had to be made aware of unique Chinese concepts such as “debt of honour”, “duties” “Hou Tai or backers, and “Guanxi or connections”. These concepts placed cultural obligations on Chinese to one another vs to Canada.

(4) As of 1997, over 200 Canadian companies were under the direct or indirect control of China. Many Canadians will be shocked to learn that one of those 200 companies is the CIBC, one of Canada’s five largest banks. Another major bank in Canada under Mainland China’s control is the Hong Kong Bank of Canada



(5) Also as of 1907, examples of other Chinese-controlled “Canadian” companies were CITIC, Norinco, Husky Oil, Grand Adex Properties Inc., Merril Lynch, Gordon Capital Inc., Tai Foong International, Ramada Hotels, China Vision, and Semi-Tech Corporation). (Editor’s Note: Because Liberal Prime Minister Jean Chretien’s government ignored the recommendations of Sidewinder and even ordered it to be destroyed, the number of companies now controlled by Mainland China is almost certainly exponentially higher.)

(6) The Chinese government has gained influence in Canadian politics by maximizing their presence over some of this country’s economic levers. The steps in Chinese strategy were as follows : (a) Buy a “Canadian” company so as to obtain a “local identity”, legally concealing their foreign identity. (b) Under the “Canadian” banner, the Chinese-Canadian company then invests or buys other companies in various Canadian economic sectors. Control lies in Hong Kong or Beijing. The financial benefits of research, often paid for by Ottawa or the provinces are likely to go to Asia. The financial network of Chinese entrepreneurs (connected with triads or Beijing) has grown exponentially and very rapidly in Canada. Their influence over local, provincial and national political leaders has also increased. Chinese entrepreneurs have offered company board positions to Canadian politicians. Many of these company boards are China-owned.

(7) These companies are eligible to receive Canadian government subsidies for research or to bid on classified contracts from Federal Departments. The risks to Canada were that : (A) After the research is done, it can be transferred to China. and (B) Access gained to classified contracts is gained for China. Two examples of noticeable risk: (a) A Canadian company under Mainland Chinese influence competed for a contract to set up and run a classified communications system that linked the main agencies of the Canadian Intelligence community!!! This would enable the Chinese to obtain access to sensitive information. (b) A Chinese multinational bought a Canadian company that specialized in video surveillance. Both of these companies may have installed security systems for various Canadian government institutions or Canadian research industries. China thus had access to information it would never have obtained directly.

 

Sidewinder – Exposing The Poisonous Snake of China’s Infiltration into Canada Part 1

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Sidewinder – Exposing The Poisonous Snake of China’s Infiltration into Canada Part 1

 By David Barswell

The return of Hong Kong to China by the British resulted in a mass migration (prior to the handover date in 1997)  of Chinese entrepreneurs who did not want to live under Communism.   This stream of political and economic refugees to the West provided cover for criminals and for members of China’s intelligence services to penetrate Canada.  (1)

The joint RCMP-CSIS investigation into this massive threat to Canada’s economic and military  security, known as “Operation Sidewinder”, culminated in 1997’s Sidewinder report on “Chinese Intelligence Services and Triads Financial Links in Canada.”  (2)

 

The word “Sidewinder” was used deliberately. The Sindwinder is a  venomous pit-viper species found in the southwestern United States,. The word referred to the serious danger that a significant number of Chinese posed to Canada.

The targets in this on-going enterprise were largely military and economic, chosen to obtain financial and political influence in the Canadian economy and government, and to obtain high-tech information of use to the People’s Liberation Army.

The Sidewinder Report explored the extent to which the People’s Republic of China had succeeded in  penetrating Canada.  It was never released because of the explosive political implications, and the fear of a backlash from the hundreds of thousands of Canadian citizens of Chinese origin.

Sidewinder was ignored, and all copies destroyed – except for one, which a disgruntled analyst leaked to the press in a traditional brown envelope.

Sidewinder addresses the People’s Liberation Army’s use of the cover provided by the Hong Kong emigrants into Canada to insert intelligence operatives who set up businesses for a variety of purposes.

Canadian Forces defence contracts could be awarded to companies controlled by the People’s Liberation Army, and companies under Chinese government control could obtain research grants from the Canadian government, then ship the fruits of the research to China after we had paid for it.

Canada’s generosity, business-friendly policies and research subsidies, made us a sitting-duck target for China to exploit and to take almost unlimited advantage of.

And, of course, companies under Chinese government control routinely obtain political influence in Canada by making donations to our major political parties.

Here are two other examples of Mainland China’s sinister infiltration.

The Teck corporation, for example, which describes itself as “Canada’s largest diversified mining company”, donated $2.3 million to the B.C. Liberals in 2015, and interestingly enough, in July of this year, Dermod Travis of Integrity BC drew attention to Teck’s appointment of a “Chinese government official” to Teck’s board of directors in April.  Mr. Travis stated : “You have an official with a foreign government who is sitting on the board of a public company in Canada… There are a lot of people in China they could have chosen, and the fact this individual is a member of the government should set off alarm bells.” (3).

In 2012, a recently-arrived Chinese “temporary worker” hired by HD Mining International Limited filed a human rights complaint against the United Steelworkers over their campaign to stop the bringing-in of temporaries (Temporary Foreign Workers)  to work for HD, saying that union leaflets and content on the union’s website were “likely to create contempt for Chinese people” (4).

The corporation itself also threatened to sue the federal government for damages over public statements made by Ministers of The Crown about the company.