Tag Archives: Dominic Barton

Big Business Leaders Warn Politicians Not to Make Immigration an Election Issue

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Big Business Leaders Warn Politicians Not to Make Immigration an Election Issue
 
      In explaining how Canada’s political class has managed to avoid a discussion of the real goals of the open door immigration policies pursued since 1965 — that is the replacement of Canada’s European founding/settler people by 2050, it’s simple. Immigration is never discussed except as a vote buying gimmick to entice various selfish ethnic groups with more goodies — allowing grandparents in, for instance.
 
      That consensus may be breaking down. Canadians are beginning to wake up. They see the treasonous farce at the Quebec-U.S. border where over 42,000 illegals have surged in with Mounties carrying their suitcases. They see homeless shelters in Toronto, Montreal, and Hamilton filled with illegals while our own homeless are on the streets. Angry Canadians have protested the open borders for months in cities across Canada in the Yellow Vest movement and other groups.
 
     The elite is worried. If enough Canadians wake up and realize what’s been done to them — they are being replaced with a new Third World majority and entertained with empty chants of “Diversity is Our Greatest Strength” — there could be a real revolt.
 
      Thus, a spokesman for business leaders who dream of a Canada with 100-million people, almost all from non-European sources by the end of the century are urging the politicians to cool it. Don’t discuss immigration.
 
        “Big business leaders worried about Canada’s aging demographics have been urging political parties to avoid inflaming the immigration debate ahead of this fall’s federal election. The head of the lobby group representing chief executives of Canada’s largest corporations said he’s already raised the issue with political leaders who are shifting into campaign mode for the October vote. With signs of public concern about immigration, Business Council of Canada president and CEO Goldy Hyder said he’s promoted the economic case in favour of opening the country’s doors to more people. ‘We are 10 years away from a true demographic pressure point,’ Hyder said during a meeting with reporters Thursday in Ottawa. ‘What I’ve said to the leaders of the political parties on this issue is, ‘Please, please do all you can to resist making this election about immigration.’ That’s as bluntly as I can say it to them.'” (CTV News, April 26, 2019)
 
      We’ve heard the aging demographic nonsense for 30 years. With significant unemployment in Canada today — officially 5.8 per cent in March, 2019, real rate nearly twice as high — we don’t need any immigration. If, in 10 years time, there is a labour shortage, then and only then might immigration make sense. Why import people today for jobs that might be there in 10 years time?
 
       What big business is really looking for is a large pool of unemployed people to keep wages low.
 
       Many Canadians are feeling uneasy about the replacement going on before their eyes. In just a generation, Toronto and Vancouver — the two largest cities in English Canada — have seen the European founding/settler people replaced with a new Third World majority. “A poll released this month by Ekos Research Associates suggested that the share of people who think there are too many visible minorities in Canada is up ‘significantly,’ even though overall opposition to immigration has been largely unchanged in recent years and remains lower than it was in the 1990s. Canada has been ratcheting up its immigration numbers and it plans to welcome more. The Immigration Department set targets of bringing in nearly 331,000 newcomers this year, 341,000 in 2020 and 350,000 in 2021, according to its 2018 report to Parliament.
Goldy Heyder
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Goldy Hyder, President and CEO of the Business Council of Canada, speaks at the Asia Business Leaders Advisory Council
 meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019, in Hong Kong. T
 

      Hyder said he’s personally part of a group called the Century Initiative, which would like to see Canada, a country of about 37 million, grow to 100 million people by 2100. The group was co-founded by Hyder and several others, including two members of the Trudeau government’s influential economic advisory council — Dominic Barton, global managing director of consulting firm McKinsey & Co., and Mark Wiseman, a senior managing director for investment management giant BlackRock Inc. Hyder was a business consultant before joining the business council and was once a top aide to federal Progressive Conservative leader Joe Clark.”