Tag Archives: Roxham Road

Nigerian sex offender who came to Canada via Roxham Road fights extradition to U.S.

Posted on by
A Nigerian sex offender who crossed into Canada at Roxham Road is appealing his extradition to the U.S. on the grounds he should be considered a refugee.

Adesanya Prince is wanted in Harris County, Texas, where he pleaded guilty to a charge of “promotion of child pornography” on Feb. 23, 2018, but fled to Canada before he was sentenced.

READ MORE: Nigerian man wanted in Texas on child pornography charges still detained in Canada

Prince is currently in custody in Canada, 19 months after he arrived via Roxham Road, the controversial unofficial border crossing south of Montreal. Last March, Justice Minister David Lametti ordered that Prince be returned to the U.S.

Yet in documents filed with Quebec’s Court of Appeal, Prince is fighting the extradition.

Story continues below advertisement

In the appeal, Prince’s lawyer, Marie-Hélène Giroux, raises three arguments.

She says the minister’s order should be quashed because it didn’t consider that if returned to the U.S., Prince might be deported to Nigeria. Giroux also argues the minister should have considered the conditions Prince would face in Texas prisons. And finally, she says the minister didn’t have the jurisdiction to determine Prince wasn’t a refugee under the United Nations 1951 Refugee Convention.

The federal government has yet to file a response to Prince’s request for the appeal. The Quebec Court of Appeals has not yet set a date, but may hear the case sometime this fall or winter.

Nigerian sex offender wanted in Texas slips into Canada

Nigerian sex offender wanted in Texas slips into Canada

Prince, 51, originally consented to extradition on Nov. 1, 2018. However, according to his lawyer, he later changed his mind. He remains in detention at a Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) facility north of Montreal.

Prince walked across the border into Canada on March 9, 2018. He had pleaded guilty to a child pornography charge in Texas just days earlier and was out on a US$10,000 bond awaiting sentencing. Rather than show up for his sentencing hearing on May 10, 2018, Prince fled to Canada.

He faces a minimum of two years in prison.

READ MORE: Registered sex offender slipped into Canada through illegal Quebec crossing

Immediately after crossing the border, Prince was detained by RCMP officers stationed at Roxham Road. He was then turned over to CBSA agents for screening. It was during a security background check that agents found Prince was wanted in Texas on child porn charges.

Story continues below advertisement

According to court documents obtained by Global News, Prince is originally from Nigeria but had been living in Houston, Texas. The documents state that in January 2017, he was working as a security guard when he sent a co-worker three videos on a cellphone app. Two of the videos involved bestiality, while the third depicted the graphic sexual assault of a young girl aged two to four.

The co-worker told police that Prince also made unsolicited sexual advances towards her including, on two occasions, trying to grab her breasts.

The court documents include a letter from Harris County assistant district attorney Thomas Waddle. In it, Waddle states that Prince presents a danger to Canada and may have been attempting to flee to Nigeria.

“The timing of Prince’s flight demonstrates that he was attempting to avoid serving a sentence for the criminal acts to which we admitted guilt,” Waddle writes.

Statistics reveal spike in asylum seeker border crossings

Statistics reveal spike in asylum seeker border crossings

Prince agreed to be extradited to the U.S., signing a “consent to committal” and forfeiting the right to a committal hearing. The last step was for the federal justice minister to sign off on the extradition, which he did in March.

However, before the extradition took place, Prince changed his mind and filed an appeal of the minister’s decision.

Despite being a flight danger and a potential threat, at one point, Prince was released from custody and spent three days living on Montreal’s West Island.

Story continues below advertisement

Quebec Superior Court Justice Daniel Royer ordered Prince released on Aug. 2, 2018. The U.S. had filed an extradition request for the imposition of a prosecution, but as Prince had already pleaded guilty, the extradition request should have been for the imposition of a sentence.

Royer ruled that there was insufficient evidence presented at the hearing to hold Prince for prosecution and ordered him released.

The U.S. filed a new provisional arrest request three days later, and Prince gave himself up to police.

In registering a guilty plea in Texas last year, Prince was officially entered into the U.S. sex offender registry, a designation he will hold until the end of his life.

MAXIME BERNIER LEADER OF THE PEOPLE’S PARTY OF CANADA WITH COMMON SENSE ABOUT SECURING THE BORDER

Posted on by

MAXIME BERNIER LEADER OF THE PEOPLE’S PARTY OF CANADA WITH COMMON SENSE ABOUT SECURING THE BORDER 

 

How we should be managing our border at Roxham Road. Cheap. Effective.

 

“Instead of making it easier to enter Canada and helping these illegal refugees, as the Liberal government has done, we will make it more difficult, by fencing off the areas where it takes place such as Roxham Road in Quebec.”

Maxime Bernier
@MaximeBernier

 

Image

MORE COSTS TO THE TAXPAYERS OF TRUDEAU’S ILLEGALS: Canada: Trudeau paying those who live near Quebec border up to $25,000 for disruptions caused by migrant influx DEC 15, 2018 8:30 AM BY CHRISTINE DOUGLASS-WILLIAMS 15 COMMENTS Beyond the immediate medical, living and housing costs for economic migrants who are flowing into Canada illegally over the Quebec border, Canadian taxpayers are also doling out significant amounts of cash for an unexpected expense: Quebecers living by the Canada-United States border where thousands of migrants have crossed irregularly into the country since 2017 will be eligible for payments of up to $25,000, the federal government….Life along the previously sleepy Roxham Road — the main entry point for migrants entering the country on foot — has been disturbed, and residents deserve to be compensated, Border Security Minister Bill Blair said. Trudeau has a history of extravagance. He has tried to buy the media with a 600-million-dollar bailout package that has been described by many as “headline buying” or “media management.” Now he’s trying to pacify residents or border areas whose lives have been disrupted by the migrant crossings that should have been stopped immediately after they began. The Toronto Sun reported during the summer months, when migrants were pouring in by the hundreds each day: Roxham Road, a narrow paved road lined by horse farms and marshes, has served as a path recently for Palestinians, Colombians, Ghanaians, Nigerians, Haitians, Zimbabweans and Pakistanis, among others. Who is going to pay for the traumatized guests of the Radisson Toronto East hotel, where about 400 refugees from Africa occupied all but two floors of the hotel, turning the Radisson into a squalid migrant camp? We also hope that no one has forgotten Trudeau’s welcome of anyone and everyone, including Islamic State jihadis, into the country, with Canadians given no say in the matter. Trudeau thinks that Islamic State jihadis can be a “powerful voice” for deradicalization. He also thinks that questions about his mismanagement of Canada’s borders are “Islamophobic.” Canadians can expect to dole out much more money, particularly in the upcoming election year, and given the unpopular UN Migration Pact. The simplest questions about the Pact, which is claimed to be non-binding, must be asked: why is such a Pact even needed? Has Canada now fully subscribed to the globalist vision of open borders? Who is footing the bill for the migrant influx and the integration and assimilation of the migrants? Canada is already at a four-decade low in its employment rate, and it’s are likely only to get worse. “Residents near U.S. border in Quebec to be paid up to $25,000 for asylum seeker disruption: Bill Blair,” by Mylene Crete, Canadian Press, December 12, 2018: OTTAWA — Quebecers living by the Canada-United States border where thousands of migrants have crossed irregularly into the country since 2017 will be eligible for payments of up to $25,000, the federal government announced Wednesday. Life along the previously sleepy Roxham Road — the main entry point for migrants entering the country on foot — has been disturbed, and residents deserve to be compensated, Border Security Minister Bill Blair said. “I’ve been there. I’ve spoken to the residents. I’ve seen the level of activity of the RCMP, the (Canada Border Services Agency) and other officials that has impacted what is otherwise a quiet, rural road,” Blair told reporters. Roughly 96 per cent of all migrants who have crossed illegally into Canada since 2017 have done so at Roxham Road. The federal Immigration Department says 16,000 people crossed the Canada-U.S. border illegally into Quebec through the end of October this year, and about 19,000 did last year. Bureaucrats divided the Roxham Road area into three zones based on proximity to the border. People living in the closest zone are eligible to receive up to $25,000, those in the next closest $10,000, and those in the third zone $2,500…

Posted on by

Canada: Trudeau paying those who live near Quebec border up to $25,000 for disruptions caused by migrant influx

Beyond the immediate medical, living and housing costs for economic migrants who are flowing into Canada illegally over the Quebec border, Canadian taxpayers are also doling out significant amounts of cash for an unexpected expense:

Quebecers living by the Canada-United States border where thousands of migrants have crossed irregularly into the country since 2017 will be eligible for payments of up to $25,000, the federal government….Life along the previously sleepy Roxham Road — the main entry point for migrants entering the country on foot — has been disturbed, and residents deserve to be compensated, Border Security Minister Bill Blair said.

Trudeau has a history of extravagance. He has tried to buy the media with a 600-million-dollar bailout package that has been described by many as “headline buying” or “media management.”  Now he’s trying to pacify residents or border areas whose lives have been disrupted by the migrant crossings that should have been stopped immediately after they began.

The Toronto Sun reported during the summer months, when migrants were pouring in by the hundreds each day:

Roxham Road, a narrow paved road lined by horse farms and marshes, has served as a path recently for Palestinians, Colombians, Ghanaians, Nigerians, Haitians, Zimbabweans and Pakistanis, among others.

Who is going to pay for the traumatized guests of the Radisson Toronto East hotel, where about 400 refugees from Africa occupied all but two floors of the hotel, turning the Radisson into a squalid migrant camp? We also hope that no one has forgotten Trudeau’s welcome of anyone and everyone, including Islamic State jihadis, into the country, with Canadians given no say in the matter. Trudeau thinks that Islamic State jihadis can be a “powerful voice” for deradicalization. He also thinks that questions about his mismanagement of Canada’s borders are “Islamophobic.”

Canadians can expect to dole out much more money, particularly in the upcoming election year, and given the unpopular UN Migration Pact. The simplest questions about the Pact, which is claimed to be non-binding, must be asked: why is such a Pact even needed? Has Canada now fully subscribed to the globalist vision of open borders? Who is footing the bill for the migrant influx and the integration and assimilation of the migrants? Canada is already at a four-decade low in its employment rate, and it’s are likely only to get worse.

“Residents near U.S. border in Quebec to be paid up to $25,000 for asylum seeker disruption: Bill Blair,” by Mylene Crete, Canadian Press, December 12, 2018:

OTTAWA — Quebecers living by the Canada-United States border where thousands of migrants have crossed irregularly into the country since 2017 will be eligible for payments of up to $25,000, the federal government announced Wednesday.

Life along the previously sleepy Roxham Road — the main entry point for migrants entering the country on foot — has been disturbed, and residents deserve to be compensated, Border Security Minister Bill Blair said.

“I’ve been there. I’ve spoken to the residents. I’ve seen the level of activity of the RCMP, the (Canada Border Services Agency) and other officials that has impacted what is otherwise a quiet, rural road,” Blair told reporters.

Roughly 96 per cent of all migrants who have crossed illegally into Canada since 2017 have done so at Roxham Road.

The federal Immigration Department says 16,000 people crossed the Canada-U.S. border illegally into Quebec through the end of October this year, and about 19,000 did last year.

Bureaucrats divided the Roxham Road area into three zones based on proximity to the border. People living in the closest zone are eligible to receive up to $25,000, those in the next closest $10,000, and those in the third zone $2,500…